Pages with tag ChromeOS

Can I use a Chromebook with ATT DSL? Or other WiFi router to the Internet? Chromebooks are popular inexpensive computers that are wonderful to use around the house for light-weight web surfing and e-mail and writing. Chromebooks connect to WiFi and sometimes to Ethernet. They can connect to any LAN supporting either. If that LAN has a gateway to the Internet, they can easily use that gateway and provide access to the general Internet.
Chrome will become a new application distribution platform for any operating system - over time What if a browser-based application can act in a desktop computer the same way as any regular application? Typically, browser based applications stay within the browser, and are launched inside the browser, while regular applications are launched through the regular desktop menubar or file system browser. Typically these worlds don't meet, but what if they did?
Chromebox for Meetings should decimate the incumbent audio/video conferencing market Chromebooks are now being joined by Chromebox's, and we should start to wonder whether Chrome devices will represent a whole new wave of computing platforms. That is, will Chrome devices take a place alongside Windows PC's, Mac's and Android/iOS mobile devices as a major computing platform? I'm typing this on a Chromebook and have to say the experience is pretty good, enough that I haven't used my Macbook Pro for several days where previously I'd used it daily.
Install Chrome OS On Your Old Laptop PC or Macbook using Cloudready Chromebooks are excellent devices, offering a light-weight operating environment with great security features. You can buy ChromeOS devices with the operating system loaded in, which is a great choice. You may have an older computer sitting around gathering dust, whose useful lifetime can be extended by installing Cloudready. Cloudready is a ChromeOS distribution by Neverware that can be installed on a huge variety of x86 based computers. On the same hardware where Windows is SLOW, Cloudready runs FAST.
Installing Android on (almost) any Chromebook Android has come to ChromeOS devices, which is supposedly great if your device is one of the few for which Android is supported. What if your Chromebook or Chromebox does not support Android? This video shows a method for installing the Android Play Store on those devices which will eventually be allowed to run Android apps. It involves putting the device into Developer Mode and running the Canary builds, so this is not for the faint of heart. After some other low-level tweekery, you have the Android Play Store.
Installing Skype, photo/video editing, word processors, and more on a Chromebook Chromebooks offer respite from antivirus software hassles, system maintenance hassles, and more. The idea is that with the Chrome web browser as the only user interface, people can compute in safety. But what about the whole slew of existing software that runs outside web browsers - Skype being just one example. What about video or audio editing? What about traditional word processors or spreadsheet applications? None of those run inside a web browser. Yet. For a long period of time the only way to install Skype involved installing Crouton, the add-on supporting Linux software as described below. Since this was originally posted in Feb 2014, Microsoft released an official Skype for Chromebooks. However, Crouton is still useful because of the need for other software such as Gimp, for image manipulation.
Revisiting software development on Chromebooks - rapidly improving state of Chrome apps for developers Chromebooks make surprisingly great laptops for software developers. If you don't know much about the Chromebook model, you might dismiss it as just a web-browser with delusions of grandeur. I'm a long-time software developer, writing code for a living since the mid-80's primarily on Unix/Linux/MacOSX systems, and I've pretty much abandoned my MacBookPro in favor of a Chromebook. The Chromebook is much faster than the MacBook (primarily due to the SSD drive), and lots lots lots cheaper to buy/own than any MacBook or MacBookPro. Yes the Chromebook doesn't have native code apps, but there is a growing list of Chrome apps available and if you're desparate enough for native app support you can always jailbreak the thing and install Linux and access the open source native apps. The result is a system with a top-of-the-line modern web browser (Chrome), with a hugely great security story, many very interesting Chrome apps, and the possibility to install Linux.
Why do we need Skype et al on Chromebook - should Google do everything for us? Yesterday we wrote how to install Skype and other desktop software on ChromeOS devices, using Crouton. Today we ponder 'Why?'. Google intends the ChromeOS environment to provide a huge portion of our needs, but we went to a lot of trouble to install Crouton. Are we nuts? No, there are valid ideas going on here.
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