Blog Index for September 2013

Google's Blogger now supports autoposting to Google+ pages

(Tue, 2013-09-10 07:10) The Google-Plusification of Blogger is proceeding, with Google now making it possible to immediately create a post on a Google+ page for any post made on a Blogger blog.  This raises the spectre of blogs roboposting and filling Google+ the way it happens on Twitter.  However, it's quite convenient to automate some of your social media interaction.  This is a new feature, and follows a move a few months to use Google+ for comments on a Blogger post.

Sony's new QX10/QX100 cameras are a marriage between Internet and high-res Photograph

(2013-09-09 11:08) Is it still a camera if there's no viewfinder or display screen?  Sony just introduced a pair of cameras meant to pair with smart phones.  But these are cameras unlike any we've ever seen before.  They're just a lens, sensor, and memory card, no display screen or viewfinder.  Which might leave you wondering just how to compose a shot.  However, these cameras are meant to clip to the back of a smart phone, and use the smart phone as the display.

A quick guide to buying the best SD card for a digital camera to shoot movies

(2013-09-07 00:31) As I wrote in (davidherron.com) a recent post, I'm buying a new digital camera.  That means thinking about which SD card is best to get for the camera.  Fortunately the memory card format war is largely over, meaning pretty much all digital cameras today use the SD card format, but there are multiple types of SD cards.  Primarily they vary on memory card speed and most of the card makers print a speed like "15 MB/second" on the card, like on my two-year-old card, or the one shown here which says 94 MB/second.

Feedspot takes lead as Google Reader replacement by making RSS export free

(2013-09-06 18:10)

The race for a credible Google Reader replacement has been on for months since the Google Reader Shutdown.  One of the contending services, Feedspot, just gained a big advantage with an announcement this morning that their RSS Export feature was now available for free accounts.  The RSS export feature had previously only been available with the paid accounts, and fills a big functionality hole none of the other Google Reader Replacements had successfully filled - easy export of your data from your Feed Reader.

Some of us Google Reader users had used it as part of a workflow of generating content for later re-use in other software or other venues.  We depended on being able to easily export items we tagged or starred, reusing them elsewhere.  For example, as input to a list of news items you'd put into a newsletter.

The general principle is that it's your data, and therefore you must be free to make use of that data.