Pages with tag Linux Single Board Computers

Cryptomining for altcoins (Magi Coin) on linux single board computers

Bitcoin's value is flying high currently making for lots of interest in how you earn Bitcoin. One earns any cryptocurrency by "mining", which is putting your computer's CPU power to work helping to maintain the blockchain used by the particular currency. In the Bitcoin market, the only mining equipment that is profitable are expensive ASIC-based equipment running extremely custom hardware produced for the specific task of Bitcoin mining. CPU mining, or using a regular computer, is completely untenable for mining Bitcoin, but some other cryptocurrencies are still open to CPU mining.

Because the ARM-based Linux single board computers (like the Raspberry Pi) have extremely low power consumption, they're attractive for this task. The video below goes over the steps required to set up cryptomining on Linux single-board-computers for a specific cryptocurrency.

The primary advantage is their extremely low power consumption. The main cost any cryptocurrency miner faces is the electricity required to power the machine.

DIY Build your own laptop for under $100

Tired of paying thousands of dollars for laptops you can't customize? We used to be able to take apart laptops, fix anything, upgrade them any way we want. Increasingly we're facing laptop choices where the need-for-thin and lightweighting means laptops are glued together, with components soldered to logic boards, and the whole thing is unfixable and unupgradeable. One response is what I've done - this is being typed on a 2012 MacBook Pro that's upgraded to the max in the hope it'll remain viable until sometime in the future when Apple wakes up to what we want. The mindset currently running Apple is missing something big.

Another choice is what's shown in this video -- find out a way to make your own laptop using cheap DIY methods. DIY computer hardware is growing more powerful every year. The exact build shown here is pretty ridiculous, so we should treat this as demonstration of a minimum-viable-product rather than a completed anything. Namely, the build shown here is a Raspberry Pi in a rough cardboard case, a pair of 18650 battery cells with a voltage regulator for power, various hacked up cables, a simple HDMI for display, and everything hot-glued together.

There are several ways to improve on this -- for example the Orange Pi and Banana Pi lines both include boards with 2GB of memory and support SATA drives -- hello large SSD for fast mass storage. And it should be possible to rig up a proper rigid case and a better keyboard/mouse. For a display it's possible to get a laptop display, remove the LCD portion, find an HDMI driver board, and rig it up in a bezel.

FireFly RK3399 Plus Development Board / Single Board computer - unboxing and review The FireFly RK3399 is a high-end ARM-based single board computer. It comes with 2GB memory up to 4GB, and up to 32GB of eMMC on-board flash storage, dual WiFi, a long list of ports including dual cameras, USB3 plus USB2, PCIe, and more. With 4GB of memory this unit is equivalent in performance to the ChromeOS devices, but is open enough you control the operating system and more. The PCIe brings the option of using regular hard disks or SSD's.
Helios4 ARM-based Linux SBC DIY NAS with 4 SATA ports The Helios4 is an open source NAS system based on a dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 CPU that includes 4 SATA3 ports. Because the board includes SATA ports, the hard drives run at full speed giving better NAS performance. The system runs operating system distributions based on either FreeBSD or Linux, which of course includes NAS systems like Open Media Vault. Finally, a single-board-computer with which to build a low cost low energy consumption do-it-yourself NAS system.
NanoPi M4 can now be used as a multi-drive NAS with new HAT expansion board The NanoPi M4 is a powerful single board Linux computer, and with the addition of this new addon HAT it can directly power four SATA drives. With a suitable case you can easily build a RAID NAS using OpenMediaVault for a very cheap price. This combination should offer similar capabilities to the Drobo 5N I have - both run Linux on an ARM CPU and support several SATA drives. The difference being that with the NanoPi M4 one has an open system to configure as desired, whereas with the Drobo is closed and hard to customize.
NanoPi board and accessories buying guide. DIY makers around the world are building customized computerized gizmos thanks to the Raspberry Pi, and similar computers. These diminuitive computers pack a lot of computing power, at low energy requirements, and by running Linux they are more approachable than microcontrollers like the Arduino. The Raspberry Pi is the best known of this class of computer. Because of the very large user community, there is a ton of accessories, books, tutorials, and more focusing on the Raspberry Pi.
NanoPi-M3: 8 blazing cores, but... // Review The NanoPi-M3 has 8 1.4GHz ARM cores, 1 GB data, 1+ GHz CPU, 1GHZ Ethernet, and a number of useful ports. The CPU generates a lot of heat so a heat-sink is necessary, except it's danged difficult to mount one. It has more GPIO pins than the Raspberry Pi. There's a number of ports on various chips that aren't exposed to users. It has enough warts that one might not want to use this, unless high parallel computation rate is needed thanks to the 8 cores.
OpenMediaVault on Raspberry PI 3 - Plex Media Server Plugin A short video showing you how to setup openmediavault on raspberry pi 3. How to enable Plex Media Server plugin.
Raspberry Pi Zero W, inexpensive Zero goodness, now with WiFi for just $10 The original Raspberry Pi Zero was a game-changer for inexpensive computers, offering a full-fledged for just $5. The biggest problem was the lack of WiFi. The Raspberry Pi foundation have now fixed that, unveiling the new Zero W with both WiFi and Bluetooth.
The UDOO Advanced Plus - x86 based single board computer running regular Linux

The UDOO Advanced Plus is so much higher priced than most single-board-computers that it doesn't fit the Maker Project idea. At $160 or so per board it's not like taking a $35 Raspberry Pi to toss into a project. Where the UDOO shines, though, is as a desktop computer. Because it has an x86 CPU, it runs regular operating systems, and the board includes normal ports for connecting to SSD's and hard disks and whatnot. The peripherals include a pair of M.2 ports for WiFi and SSD support, a SATA to connect up a regular disk, 3x USB3 for high speed peripherals, an HDMI and 2x Mini Display-Port connectors allowing you to connect three large screen monitors, etc. In other words, while the UDOO is a smallish computer, it's got a lot of powerful capabilities.

The UDOO Advanced Plus versus Latte Panda - x86 SBC faceoff

For more information on the UDOO Advanced Plus. Both the UDOO and LattePanda are inexpensive single-board-computers that are useful for building custom computers. This video compares the two, and finds the UDOO is more powerful and more flexible. Both run Windows very well as long as your needs are somewhat modest. Both are more powerful and flexible than the Raspberry Pi, another favorite of building custom computers.

The UDOO Bolt - revolutionary single-board-computer w/ advanced AMD Ryzen CPU and GPU

UDOO single board computers are based on x86 CPU's, rather than the typical ARM CPU's used by other SBC's. Therefore UDOO boards have a significant performance advantage, at a cost. With the UDOO Bolt, they've outdone themselves thanks to the capabilities of the Ryzen V1000 family. The UDOO Bolt is the first Single Board Computer using an AMD processor, and the V1000 family gives it phenomenal performance thanks to a 4 core CPU design coupled with a high end GPU and direct support for ethernet, 2x SATA ports, eMMC and more.

Top 5 Single Board Computers 2017

What are the best linux-single-board-computer's? There are many of these things, and running linux on a tiny computer is awesome, but the wide variety makes it difficult to choose. Do you go with the Raspberry Pi just because it's the most popular? Or because your buddy down the street got one? Some of these computers have significantly important features giving a clear advantage for certain purposes.