Pages with tag Open Source Governance

Node.js forked, Ayo.JS, is trying to find its way

A month ago we suddenly had news of a hostile fork of Node.js, called Ayo.js, by Node.js team members upset over what they called Code of Conduct violations. Supposedly another Node.js team member was routinely harrassing people (a claim he has denied) and spoke against having a Code of Conduct. I don't know whether any of that is true. What's necessary is to check in with Ayo.js, see what they're doing, and if there is any compelling technical reason for their existence.

Going by the Ayo.js issue queue, that team is considering the same problem. Several issues are suggesting breaking changes with Node.js, that might produce a superior implementation. In one issue the folks are explicitly debating whether they should maintain one-for-one compatibility, or to strike out on their own.

Node.js has been forked over Terms of Conduct violations forming Ayo.JS project

Over the last couple days, a group of Node.js project members who'd worked in the Technical Steering Committee resigned, and at the same time Node.js was forked to create the Ayo.js project. The name was chosen because it's pronounced similarly to IO, in other words this seems to be an attempt to resurrect the IO.JS fork. According to Twitter and Medium postings I've found, there are allegations of repeated Code of Conduct violations by one TSC member, and an unwillingness of other committee members to take action. Bottom line, the people involved are questioning whether the leadership of the Node.js project are properly committed to "community" and "inclusivity".

An open source software project is about much more than the code. A successful project is comprised of a community of people successfully working together. Often such projects are volunteer driven, and membership is on merit and contributions. Bottom line is that community dynamics often drive decisions about who is "in" the project and who isn't. By contrast contributing to a traditional commercial software project simply means having been hired by a company to do the work.

Node.js team adopts the Contributor Code of Conduct, fostering a welcoming environment for contributors

Yesterday the Node.js project adopted the Contributor Covenant Code of Conduct which is an important step towards fostering an open and welcoming environment ensuring the project is a harassment-free experience for everyone, regardless of age, body size, disability, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, level of experience, nationality, personal appearance, race, religion, or sexual identity and orientation. While this isn't a cool piece of technology, it is a step which should give the Node.js project a firmer standing in the world. In the past some open source projects have run into serious problems when team members acted with discrimination or harassment towards other team members. Having taken a stand like this, the team has put a firm stake in keeping the community open to all.